The Slackers' Manifesto

I refuse to pay the New York Times any money so I husband the free internet articles I get every month.  But I knew if I picked this one my views would be confirmed.

After Recession, More Young Adults Are Living on Street

By SUSAN SAULNY

SEATTLE - Duane Taylor was studying the humanities in community college and living in his own place when he lost his job in a round of layoffs. Then he found, and lost, a second job. And a third.

Now, with what he calls "lowered standards" and a tenuous new position at a Jack in the Box restaurant, Mr. Taylor, 24, does not make enough to rent an apartment or share one. He sleeps on a mat in a homeless shelter, except when his sister lets him crash on her couch.

Seemingly, every time the paper runs an article regarding how tough young people have it, they choose people who themselves are partly if not wholly responsible for their predicament (of course, the paper never points this perspective out). For example, the first "victim" majored in humanities in college.

Who guides these kids to take "easy" majors with no job prospects? Are we supposed to feel that free enterprise has ruined these kids' futures? I feel bad for middle-age people who have lost their jobs or are unemployed through no fault of their own -- not for Obama voters who are too short-sighted to face reality and expect hardworking Americans (or massive government borrowing that someone else  will pay off) to support them?

We drill into our kids the need to get jobs that will support them.  Studies show that many job openings go begging -- are these people too elitist to take them?

Note this person who says the economy defeated him:

In Washington, Lance Fuller, a 26-year-old with a degree in journalism, spent the end of last month packing up a one-bedroom apartment he can no longer afford after being laid off. Mr. Fuller said he had been unable to keep a job for more than eight months since graduating from the University of Florida in 2010.

"Thankfully, I have a girlfriend who is willing to let me stay with her until I get back on my feet again," said Mr. Fuller, who writes a blog, Voices of a Lost Generation. "It's really hard for people in my generation not to feel completely defeated by this economy." (emphases added)

My wife forced me to go to RENT years ago while visiting NYC. I could not stand that musical -- the characters were slackers --every single one. I had to endure being squeezed into expensive seats to hear a cast of whiners. I bet they all read the New York Times

I refuse to pay the New York Times any money so I husband the free internet articles I get every month.  But I knew if I picked this one my views would be confirmed.

After Recession, More Young Adults Are Living on Street

By SUSAN SAULNY

SEATTLE - Duane Taylor was studying the humanities in community college and living in his own place when he lost his job in a round of layoffs. Then he found, and lost, a second job. And a third.

Now, with what he calls "lowered standards" and a tenuous new position at a Jack in the Box restaurant, Mr. Taylor, 24, does not make enough to rent an apartment or share one. He sleeps on a mat in a homeless shelter, except when his sister lets him crash on her couch.

Seemingly, every time the paper runs an article regarding how tough young people have it, they choose people who themselves are partly if not wholly responsible for their predicament (of course, the paper never points this perspective out). For example, the first "victim" majored in humanities in college.

Who guides these kids to take "easy" majors with no job prospects? Are we supposed to feel that free enterprise has ruined these kids' futures? I feel bad for middle-age people who have lost their jobs or are unemployed through no fault of their own -- not for Obama voters who are too short-sighted to face reality and expect hardworking Americans (or massive government borrowing that someone else  will pay off) to support them?

We drill into our kids the need to get jobs that will support them.  Studies show that many job openings go begging -- are these people too elitist to take them?

Note this person who says the economy defeated him:

In Washington, Lance Fuller, a 26-year-old with a degree in journalism, spent the end of last month packing up a one-bedroom apartment he can no longer afford after being laid off. Mr. Fuller said he had been unable to keep a job for more than eight months since graduating from the University of Florida in 2010.

"Thankfully, I have a girlfriend who is willing to let me stay with her until I get back on my feet again," said Mr. Fuller, who writes a blog, Voices of a Lost Generation. "It's really hard for people in my generation not to feel completely defeated by this economy." (emphases added)

My wife forced me to go to RENT years ago while visiting NYC. I could not stand that musical -- the characters were slackers --every single one. I had to endure being squeezed into expensive seats to hear a cast of whiners. I bet they all read the New York Times

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