Muslim Brotherhood's idea of democracy

I suppose we shouldn't be surprised that when it comes to democracy in action, the Muslim Brotherhood talks a good game but doesn't play one.

Daily Mail:

Egypt's ruling party is paying gangs of thugs to sexually assault women protesting in Cairo's Tahrir Square against President Mohamed Morsi, activists said.

They also said the Muslim Brotherhood is paying gangs to beat up men who are taking part in the latest round of protests, which followed a decree by President Morsi to give himself sweeping new powers.

It comes as the Muslim Brotherhood co-ordinated a demonstration today in support of President Mohamed Morsi, who is rushing through a constitution to try to defuse opposition fury over his newly expanded powers.

[...]

But amid the calls for democracy a sinister threat has emerged.

Magda Adly, the director of the Nadeem Centre for Human Rights, said that under Mubarak, the Government paid thugs to beat male protestors and sexually assault women.

'This is still happening now,' she told The Times. 'I believe thugs are being paid money to do this ... the Muslim Brotherhood have the same political approaches as Mubarak,' she said.

Morsi's power grab will apparently succeed now that a referndum on the new constitution has been scheduled for December 15. That's barely enough time to read the document much less debate it.

But that won't matter. The opposition is still weak and disorganized. It should pass overwhelmingly.






I suppose we shouldn't be surprised that when it comes to democracy in action, the Muslim Brotherhood talks a good game but doesn't play one.

Daily Mail:

Egypt's ruling party is paying gangs of thugs to sexually assault women protesting in Cairo's Tahrir Square against President Mohamed Morsi, activists said.

They also said the Muslim Brotherhood is paying gangs to beat up men who are taking part in the latest round of protests, which followed a decree by President Morsi to give himself sweeping new powers.

It comes as the Muslim Brotherhood co-ordinated a demonstration today in support of President Mohamed Morsi, who is rushing through a constitution to try to defuse opposition fury over his newly expanded powers.

[...]

But amid the calls for democracy a sinister threat has emerged.

Magda Adly, the director of the Nadeem Centre for Human Rights, said that under Mubarak, the Government paid thugs to beat male protestors and sexually assault women.

'This is still happening now,' she told The Times. 'I believe thugs are being paid money to do this ... the Muslim Brotherhood have the same political approaches as Mubarak,' she said.

Morsi's power grab will apparently succeed now that a referndum on the new constitution has been scheduled for December 15. That's barely enough time to read the document much less debate it.

But that won't matter. The opposition is still weak and disorganized. It should pass overwhelmingly.






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